Archive for March, 2015

31
Mar
15

Hey!

🙂

31
Mar
15

Chat On

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, with members of the national security team, participate in a secure video teleconference from the Situation Room of the White House with Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and the U.S. negotiating team in Lausanne, Switzerland, to discuss the P5+1 negotiations with Iran, March 31, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

31
Mar
15

A Tweet Or Two

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So sorry for the setback, GB. We here at TOD want you to know that we have your back, we admire your strength and courage, and we are rooting for you all the way

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Yay

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Different day. Same disgusting BS

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Wow

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There is no pleading ignorance about nooses. When you use a noose against a Black person, everyone knows what you mean. Everyone one knows the threat, violence, and racism it represents. Everyone knows that you are terrorizing Black people

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But…but…cops are here to protect everyone

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Great article

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Continue reading ‘A Tweet Or Two’

31
Mar
15

President Of The People

Barack Obama

President Barack Obama signs a Memorandum of Disapproval regarding a joint resolution providing for congressional disapproval of a rule submitted by the National Labor Relations Board relating to representation case procedures. The joint resolution passed by Congress is a rarely used oversight tool that allows legislators to block regulatory actions

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Barack Obama

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Barack Obama

31
Mar
15

Chat Away

@pari_passu

31
Mar
15

Rise and Shine

On This Day: President Obama plays with 5 month-old Vann Carroll during a visit with wounded warriors and their families who were touring the White House, in the East Room, March 31, 2014. Vann was visiting with mom Ryan Carroll and dad, Major Ben Carroll (Photo by Pete Souza)

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Today

The President has no scheduled public events (but hopefully there’ll be good news from Lausanne and we’ll hear from him)

12:30: White House Press Briefing

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On This Day

Sen. Barack Obama hugs Jean Hockenbrocht as fellow workers look on during his visit to Wilbur Chocolate Company March 31, 2008 in Lititz, Pennsylvania

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President Obama walks with First Lady Michelle Obama as they depart the White House for a week long trip to Europe, in Washington on March 31, 2009

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President Obama, surrounded by the family of Cesar Chavez and leaders of the United Farm Workers that Chavez co-founded, signs a proclamation in the Oval Office designating March 31, 2010, which would have been his 83rd birthday, as Cesar Chavez Day (Photo by Pete Souza)

First Lady Michelle Obama, White House Assistant Chef Sam Kass and students from Bancroft and Hollin Meadows elementary schools do a dance intended to help the rhubarb they just planted to grow in the White House Kitchen Garden on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on March 31, 2010

President Obama practices his pitching with trip director Marvin Nicholson in the Rose Garden of the White House, March 31, 2010 (Photo by Pete Souza)

President Obama practices his pitching form with personal aide Reggie Love and Jake Levine in the Rose Garden of the White House, March 31, 2010 (Photo by Pete Souza)

Bo stands in the Rose Garden of the White House, March 31, 2010 (Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

President Obama talks on the phone in the Oval Office, March 31, 2010 (Photo by Pete Souza)

President Obama greets an audience member prior to delivering remarks on energy security at Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility in Maryland on March 31, 2010

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President Obama smiles during the filming of a campaign video, March 31, 2011 (Photo by Christopher Dilts for Obama for America)

President Obama meets with FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, March 31, 2011. Flanking Commissioner Hamburg are Vicki Seyfert-Margolis, Senior Advisor to the FDA Commissioner for Innovative Strategy, left, and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, right (Photo by Pete Souza)

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First Lady Michelle Obama and her daughters, Sasha and Malia, tour the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton before the ship’s commissioning ceremony in Alameda, Calif., March 31, 2012

First Lady Michelle Obama and her daughters Sasha tour the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton

U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp speaks during the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton’s commissioning ceremony in Alameda, Calif., March 31, 2012. First Lady Michelle Obama is the official sponsor of the Stratton and is the first First Lady to sponsor a Coast Guard cutter.

First Lady Michelle Obama congratulates Melinda Cook, the grand niece of U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Dorothy Stratton, during the commissioning ceremony of the Cutter Stratton on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., March 31, 2012

First Lady Michelle Obama with Taylor Swift at Nickelodeon’s 25th Annual Kids’ Choice Awards, March 31, 2012

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On This Day: President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk with their daughters Sasha and Malia, right, to attend an Easter service at St. John’s Church in Washington, D.C., Sunday, March 31, 2013 (Photo by Pete Souza)

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MoooOOOooorning!

31
Mar
15

Early Bird Chat

On This Day: President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama walk with their daughters Sasha and Malia to attend an Easter service at St. John’s Church in Washington, D.C., Sunday, March 31, 2013

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MoooOOOooorning!

30
Mar
15

A Tweet Or Two

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This is insane

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Must Read

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Continue reading ‘A Tweet Or Two’

30
Mar
15

The President’s Address at the Opening of the Edward Kennedy Institute

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THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you so much. To Vicki, Ted, Patrick, Curran, Caroline, Ambassador Smith, members of the Kennedy family — thank you so much for inviting me to speak today. Your Eminence, Cardinal O’Malley; Vice President Biden; Governor Baker; Mayor Walsh; members of Congress, past and present; and pretty much every elected official in Massachusetts — (laughter) — it is an honor to mark this occasion with you.

Boston, know that Michelle and I have joined our prayers with yours these past few days for a hero — former Army Ranger and Boston Police Officer John Moynihan, who was shot in the line of duty on Friday night. (Applause.) I mention him because, last year, at the White House, the Vice President and I had the chance to honor Officer Moynihan as one of America’s “Top Cops” for his bravery in the line of duty, for risking his life to save a fellow officer. And thanks to the heroes at Boston Medical Center, I’m told Officer Moynihan is awake, and talking, and we wish him a full and speedy recovery. (Applause.)

I also want to single out someone who very much wanted to be here, just as he was every day for nearly 25 years as he represented this commonwealth alongside Ted in the Senate — and that’s Secretary of State John Kerry. (Applause.) As many of you know, John is in Europe with our allies and partners, leading the negotiations with Iran and the world community, and standing up for a principle that Ted and his brother, President Kennedy, believed in so strongly: “Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate.” (Applause.)

And, finally, in his first years in the Senate, Ted dispatched a young aide to assemble a team of talent without rival. The sell was simple: Come and help Ted Kennedy make history. So I want to give a special shout-out to his extraordinarily loyal staff — (applause) — 50 years later a family more than one thousand strong. This is your day, as well. We’re proud of you. (Applause.) Of course, many of you now work with me. (Laughter.) So enjoy today, because we got to get back to work. (Laughter.)

Distinguished guests, fellow citizens — in 1958, Ted Kennedy was a young man working to reelect his brother, Jack, to the United States Senate. On election night, the two toasted one another: “Here’s to 1960, Mr. President,” Ted said, “If you can make it.” With his quick Irish wit, Jack returned the toast: “Here’s to 1962, Senator Kennedy, if you can make it.” (Laughter.) They both made it. And today, they’re together again in eternal rest at Arlington.

But their legacies are as alive as ever together right here in Boston. The John F. Kennedy Library next door is a symbol of our American idealism; the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate as a living example of the hard, frustrating, never-ending, but critical work required to make that idealism real.

What more fitting tribute, what better testament to the life of Ted Kennedy, than this place that he left for a new generation of Americans — a monument not to himself but to what we, the people, have the power to do together.

Any of us who have had the privilege to serve in the Senate know that it’s impossible not to share Ted’s awe for the history swirling around you — an awe instilled in him by his brother, Jack. Ted waited more than a year to deliver his first speech on the Senate floor. That’s no longer the custom. (Laughter.) It’s good to see Trent and Tom Daschle here, because they remember what customs were like back then. (Laughter.)

And Ted gave a speech only because he felt there was a topic — the Civil Rights Act — that demanded it. Nevertheless, he spoke with humility, aware, as he put it, that “a freshman Senator should be seen, not heard; should learn, and not teach.”

Some of us, I admit, have not always heeded that lesson. (Laughter.) But fortunately, we had Ted to show us the ropes anyway. And no one made the Senate come alive like Ted Kennedy. It was one of the great pleasures of my life to hear Ted Kennedy deliver one of his stem winders on the Floor. Rarely was he more animated than when he’d lead you through the living museums that were his offices. He could — and he would — tell you everything that there was to know about all of it. (Laughter.)

And then there were more somber moments. I still remember the first time I pulled open the drawer of my desk. Each senator is assigned a desk, and there’s a tradition of carving the names of those who had used it before. And those names in my desk included Taft and Baker, Simon, Wellstone, and Robert F. Kennedy.

The Senate was a place where you instinctively pulled yourself up a little bit straighter; where you tried to act a little bit better. “Being a senator changes a person,” Ted wrote in his memoirs. As Vicki said, it may take a year, or two years, or three years, but it always happens; it fills you with a heightened sense of purpose.

That’s the magic of the Senate. That’s the essence of what it can be. And who but Ted Kennedy, and his family, would create a full-scale replica of the Senate chamber, and open it to everyone?

We live in a time of such great cynicism about all our institutions. And we are cynical about government and about Washington, most of all. It’s hard for our children to see, in the noisy and too often trivial pursuits of today’s politics, the possibilities of our democracy — our capacity, together, to do big things.

And this place can help change that. It can help light the fire of imagination, plant the seed of noble ambition in the minds of future generations. Imagine a gaggle of school kids clutching tablets, turning classrooms into cloakrooms and hallways into hearing rooms, assigned an issue of the day and the responsibility to solve it.

Imagine their moral universe expanding as they hear about the momentous battles waged in that chamber and how they echo throughout today’s society. Great questions of war and peace, the tangled bargains between North and South, federal and state; the original sins of slavery and prejudice; and the unfinished battles for civil rights and opportunity and equality.

Imagine the shift in their sense of what’s possible. The first time they see a video of senators who look like they do — men and women, blacks and whites, Latinos, Asian-Americans; those born to great wealth but also those born of incredibly modest means.

Continue reading ‘The President’s Address at the Opening of the Edward Kennedy Institute’

30
Mar
15

Chat Away

President Obama greets Victoria Kennedy at the dedication of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, Sen Elizabeth Warren looks on




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